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Cancer. Touches. Everyone.

Posts Tagged ‘osteosarcoma’

Our 2014 Calendars Are Ready to Pre-Order!

Posted by Erich Trapp on October 29, 2013

Trooper Collins, our 2014 cover dog.

Trooper Collins, our 2014 cover dog.

Our beautiful 2014 “Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down” calendars are ready to pre-order here. Only $15.00 each, these calendars feature the photos and stories of this year’s top 13 winners, last year’s winners’ photos, and a gallery of all the dogs entered in this year’s calendar. Unique to our calendars you’ll also find special dog holidays like Canine Cancer Awareness Month (November), Squirrel Appreciation Day, What if Dogs and Cats Had Opposable Thumbs Day, K-9 Veterans Day, National Specially-Abled Pets Day, National Cancer Survivor’s Day, Rabies Awareness Month, and of course the regular people holidays as well. Also featured is a list of the “10 L” warning signs of cancer in your pet, and information about our nationwide Puppy Up! Walks and how to get involved.

Another feature unique to our calendar contests is that the top 13 winners get to decide the cancer study they would like to fund. This year’s calendar proceeds will again go to the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. Last year’s calendar’s winners decided to help fund a study in osteosarcoma, and this year the winners decided to help fund a study into mast cell tumors.

We know you’ll enjoy this year’s calendar! Please place your orders soon. They make great gifts, and are something you and your friends will treasure for years.

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More Ways to Help

Posted by Erich Trapp on July 23, 2013

broad boxerOur “Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down” 2014 calendar is in full swing, so stop by and vote for your favorite canine cancer heroes. Your voting dollars will go to The Broad Institute again this year, and we want to raise as much as we can to further their work. Their research is international and encompasses canine cancer exploration at the DNA level. Last year the calendar contest winners chose to fund Broad’s Canine Osteosarcoma study. This year’s winners will have the same opportunity to choose which study to support.

And the work Broad does is translational*, which means it helps in human cancer research as well.

Some Background — Since the Human Genome Mapping Project began, $3 billion has been spent over 15 years to generate a reliable sequence of the human genome. Sequence of the canine genome was generated in 2004, taking only about a year to finish and costing about $50 million. (Source.)

Throughout this period of intense research, an important fact has emerged. People and dogs are extraordinarily similar in a genetic sense. But while it takes thousands of human patients with cancer to identify risk factors, it only takes maybe 100 canine patients to identify these factors in dogs. This is because their genetic makeup is not as ‘noisy’ as that of humans. As such, researchers can look at the genetics of cancer in dogs to accelerate discoveries that will benefit both dogs and people.

As you probably already know, the statistics on cancer in dogs are alarming, and in fact, the current rate of cancer is higher in dogs than it is in humans.

But did you know that dogs are:

  • Twice as likely to develop leukemia than humans.
  • Four times more likely to suffer from breast cancer.
  • Eight times more likely to develop bone cancer.
  • An incredible thirty-five times more at risk for developing skin cancer. (Source.)

So, besides voting in the calendar contest to support the work of Broad, how can you help further the research they’re doing the rest of the year?

Broad needs DNA samples from purebred dogs who have been diagnosed with the cancers Broad is studying, as well as from older, healthy dogs (ages 8+ years) from the same breeds. Currently those cancers are: Hemangiosarcoma, Osteosarcoma (bone cancer), Lymphoma, Mast Cell Tumors, Mammary Tumors, Melanoma (skin cancer), and Glioma (tumors that start in the brain or spine).

Why are DNA samples important? At its deepest root, cancer is caused by damage to the DNA. DNA is found in every cell and is responsible for directing cells in normal behavior patterns. Under normal circumstances, the body is able to repair DNA damage, but when that damage isn’t repaired, the cells begin to behave abnormally, beginning the out-of-control growth that leads to cancer formation. (Source.)

Why purebred dogs? In developing breeds, certain physical features (size, shape, coat, color) and behaviors were selected by breeders. This genetic diversity makes purebreds dogs ideal for genetic research. Using samples from only purebred dogs ensures the fastest progress for all dogs.

If your purebred dog has had cancer or is an older, healthy dogs (age 8+) please visit www.broadinstitute.org/dogsamples where you’ll find information to guide you on working with your vet to collect and ship blood samples to use in their studies.

To learn more about the breeds they study and the work your votes will be funding, please follow this link: www.broadinstitute.org/dogresearch.

Broad Institute on blackBroad’s Ethical Statement: The Broad Institute’s Canine Disease Mapping group performs disease research under a conservative ethical model that no harm should come to the dogs. Dogs enrolled in their studies are pet dogs, participating after owner consent, only in ways that do not harm them. They DO NOT induce cancer in dogs, nor do they ever keep any animals in the laboratory.

Thank you for supporting the efforts of 2 Million Dogs and The Broad Institute through your participation in the 2014 “Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down” calendar. Don’t forget to cast your votes for your favorite dogs before voting ends at midnight, EDT, August 8th.

*Translational research is research in the laboratory with an eye toward learning things that could be brought back to patients (both animal and human) in the clinical setting.

Posted in 2014 Calendar Contest, Fundraiser, Research, Stories | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Reggie Duman and His Tumexal Treatment

Posted by Erich Trapp on June 30, 2013

Beth Duman recently sent us this story about her Belgian Tervuren and an alternative treatment he is receiving for his osteosarcoma. It’s called Tumexal.

Disclaimer: Please remember, we post this and information like this to inform our readers of potential new/different/alternative treatments for their beloved companions. 2 Million Dogs does not endorse any particular treatment, protocol, therapy, veterinarian, and/or drug. It is up to each individual to do his or her own research and then act accordingly on the information they are able to gather. But we wanted to share with you the success Beth is having with this particular treatment for this particular dog and his disease. Here is what she shared with us.

Beautiful Reggie.

Beautiful Reggie.

This beautiful boy, Reggie, is a nine-year-old gorgeous Belgian Tervuren. About four months ago, he started gimping on his left front foot. We have some very good vets on our community so I visited three of them a number of times. Two of the vets are skilled in alternative medicine so Reggie received chiropractic treatments, electro-chiropractic treatments, Chinese herbs, acupuncture, pain  and anti-inflammatory medications. I also worked with a wonderful Tellington Touch practitioner and message therapist.

Reggie continued to get worse until he was in pain that was causing him to occasionally scream and making it hard for him to sleep without constantly readjusting himself because of his discomfort. We increased his pain meds. He was only going outside to relieve himself and could no longer use the doorway that involved walking down two steps to get outside.

Finally after months of his physical and mental deterioration, one of the chiropractor vets was able to feel a tumor under his left scapula. The vet was not certain that the tumor was operable  so I immediately made an appointment with the vet who was the most skilled surgeon. She did a number of X-rays and attempted to aspirate the tumor. The X-rays showed a mass 77 mm in size in an area that was not easily accessed. She had the long hard conversation with me about  possible options for Reggie. If she were to amputate his leg, she would also need to remove the shoulder. Amputation would serve to lesson his pain but, no doubt, the cancer would have already metastasized to his lungs. Chemotherapy  might add a couple months to his life, as might radiation. I asked her what she would do if he were her dog with a similar prognosis. She said pain management would be her choice. I agreed.

When I got home, I looked up a cancer researcher’s contact information. I had stumbled on Dr. Nice’s web site some months before – when my dogs were all healthy. He had sent me a Power Point presentation about his cancer intervention protocol. I immediately called Dr. Nice and arranged to have treatment sent for Reggie.

For the last month, Reggie has been taking three specially prepared capsules along with a couple of milliliters of a liquid to help him absorb the capsules. Twice a day, I rub in a cream version of the treatment on his shaved chest at the tumor site.

One month later, Reggie’s tumor has shrunk to 50 mm. He is off all pain medications and is happy and active. He has a slight limp but easily walks and trots. He’s now soliciting play from our other dogs and back to being my active friendly buddy.

He will be following Dr. Nice’s protocol for two more months. I have been in contact with Dr. Nice about Reggie’s progress and has shared that other dogs are seeing similar results. The treatment is called Tumexal. Dr. Nice’s web site is www.CanineCare.us.

I hope this information will be beneficial to others who are dealing with choosing treatment  options for their dogs. It has certainly been a blessing to us and Reggie.

 

Beth Duman, VSPDT, CPDT-KA

Beth Duman is a biologist and positive dog trainer in Michigan. Her highly rated training book, The Evolution of Charlie Darwin: Partner With Your Dog Using Positive Training, can be purchased at Amazon.com.

Posted in Research, Stories | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments »

Pssssssttt … Hey you. Yeah – you! Come over here.

Posted by Erich Trapp on June 27, 2013

Princess Daisy telling Bob a secret.

Princess Daisy telling Bob a secret. (Photo by Bev Hollis.)

There’s this calendar contest going on and I have the inside scoop … OK. OK. Yeah – I get it. Dog. Scoop. Real funny. Pay attention.

Anyway, I have the inside scoop.

Can you please stop giggling and let me tell you something? Take a breath and chill.

OK. You alright now?

Finally.

Look, there’s this terrific calendar contest going on. It’s called Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down and it’s going to have all sorts of photos and stories of very brave dogs with cancer in it, and lots of other neat stuff.  I know all about it because my friend Princess Daisy was on the very first cover. Yes, The Princess Daisy. The One and Only. That’s her in the photo, before she went to the Rainbow Bridge. She’s gossiping with her friend Bob.

So, I know Princess Daisy and she knows all about 2 Million Dogs and where they sent their calendar proceeds last year – the money they made when people like you sent them their photos and stories and votes. The Princess has a very high security clearance here at The Rainbow Bridge, and she told me that she got to read the very letter from The Broad Institute about how they’re using the funds from last year’s calendar contest to study osteosarcoma in several breeds: Leonbergers and Goldens and Great Danes and Great Pyrenees. The very funds people donated to study genes and dogs and cancer. This is very important research that Broad is doing, and they collaborate with other scientists and research organizations from all over the world. So this is a big deal. A really big deal. And all the people who participated in the contest last year had a hand in helping make this research possible by taking part in the calendar contest.

No kidding.

But what I really need to tell you is that time is running out to enter. You have to send your photos and stories to Erich (erich@2milliondogs.org) right away. And then, when voting starts, you have to get all your friends and co-workers and aunts and uncles and cousins and brothers and sister and even total strangers to vote, because the money you and your friends donate will go to research to help dogs, and even people. Yes, people. Dogs and people get the same kinds of cancers. Haven’t you been paying any attention?

The important thing to know is that each year the calendar contest supports research that help dogs and people. But you can’t help if you don’t enter and you don’t vote.

So? What are you waiting for?

Follow this link to find out about the calendar contest and how to enter.

Then send a photo and story of your dog who has or has had cancer to Erich at erich@2milliondogs.org. He’s pretty cool and he’ll write you back when he gets your stuff.

Oh, and Princess Daisy said I’d better include her cover photo from the very first Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down calendar from 2009. Princess Daisy_2009-calendarHonestly, I think she’s sticking her tongue out at cancer.

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Auburn University in Alabama Testing Bone Cancer Treatment for Dogs

Posted by Erich Trapp on May 13, 2013

Many of the dogs we have met through the 2 Million Dogs Foundation, and earlier with 2 Dog 2000 Miles, have suffered from bone cancer (osteosarcoma). This article, by Evan Belanger, details how Auburn University is testing a new treatment for osteosarcoma. You can find the complete article here as well.

Auburn testing bone-cancer treatment for dogs that could increase survivability and translate to human treatments

 

Pictured is Lily Johnson. “Most dogs suffering from bone cancer must have the impacted leg amputated. In more than 90 percent of cases, the cancer cells migrate to the lungs, creating demand for new treatments.”

Pictured is Lily Johnson.
“Most dogs suffering from bone cancer must have the impacted leg amputated. In more than 90 percent of cases, the cancer cells migrate to the lungs, creating demand for new treatments.”

By Evan Belanger

AUBURN, Alabama — Auburn University is testing a new treatment for bone cancer in dogs that a university veterinarian says could one day be broadened to treat human cancers.

The American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation has awarded Bruce Smith, director of the Auburn University Research Initiative in Cancer, a two-year grant totaling $118,848 to test the new therapy.

The treatment consists of a virus normally used as a hepatitis vaccine in dogs that has been modified to only make copies of itself when inside cancer cells.

It ruptures the cancer cells, killing them and releasing thousands of copies to attack other cancer cells.

“By using this approach, we turn the cancer cell into a factory that produces more virus,” Smith said. “You could say that we help the cancer cell become an agent of its own death.”

The immediate goal of the study is to prove the efficacy of the new treatment for bone cancer, but Smith said the long-term goal is to create a single treatment that can treat multiple types of cancer in dogs.

The lessons learned could also be used to create new treatments for human cancer and could lead to human trials in partnership with a medical college, he said.

“Ultimately, we want that to be a clinical treatment in dogs,” Smith said. “But it’s also something that’s going to tell us something about how to use this approach in people, so we’re very big on this idea of one medicine.”

Bone cancer in dogs, which accounts for about 5 percent of tumors in dogs, has a very poor survival rate.

In most cases, the dog’s leg is amputated to make the dog more comfortable and remove the tumor, but the cancer cells migrate to the lungs more than 90 percent of the time.

In those cases, dogs that receive chemotherapy typically only live nine to 12 months post diagnosis, creating demand for more effective treatments.

“This therapy attacks those metastases and will hopefully eliminate them or make them more sensitive to chemotherapy,” Smith said.

The study will involve 20 dogs over two years. All dogs must be referred by a veterinarian and must have all four legs intact so researchers can collect live cancer cells from the tumor.

The grant will cover the cost of the viral treatment, but owners must pay for the cost of amputation and chemotherapy, treatments with which the viral injection is intended to work in conjunction.

The Auburn University Research Initiative in Cancer was founded in 2012 to accelerate the translation of cancer innovation from the laboratory to the clinic.

AURIC follows a “one-medicine” concept that views human and animal health as a single field where discoveries in one species advances health in both species.

“Dogs are actually very similar physiologically to people, and a lot of the cancers they get have the same gene mutations,” Smith said.

“Tumors like breast cancer is very, very similar between dogs and humans. Dogs get skin cancer, dogs get blood cancers that are similar to human cancers, dogs get brain cancers that similar to human cancers … so what we learn in dogs is very applicable to humans.”

 

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Pre-Order Your 2013 Calendars for the Holidays

Posted by Erich Trapp on November 2, 2012

Lily Lisle, this year’s Cover Girl. Lily was touched by cancer three different times.

Time to Pre-Order Your 2013 Calendars for the Holidays

Our “Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down” calendars get better every year, and this year is no exception. Check out the 2013 cover. (Pictured is Lily Lisle, who fought 3 different cancers.) Please pre-order your calendars now. They make great gifts, are wonderful keepsakes, and every one of your friends and relatives should have at least one (if not more). And don’t forget your vet, your groomer, and your pet-sitter. Please follow this link and order now. Calendars are only $15.00 plus S&H.

We’d like you to know that your continued financial support of this year’s 2 Million Dogs’ calendar has enabled us to contribute $20,000.00 to our first canine cancer study with The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. This year, the 13 winners of the calendar contest were given the opportunity to choose from three of Broad’s canine cancer research projects, and they chose the osteosarcoma study. Osteosarcoma is the most common bone tumor of the dog. This cancer develops in the bone, usually the limbs, and as the tumor grows it becomes progressively more painful for the dog and can result in lameness. Often these tumors metastasize to the lungs.

Why does 2 Million Dogs choose to support Broad? Dogs and humans get many of the same diseases, including cancer. Studying DNA from both healthy and sick dogs can help researchers gain insights into diseases that affect both species. That work helped lay the foundation for a variety of studies into the genetic basis of disease — research that depends on help from dogs as well their human companions.

We commend Broad’s philosophy of sharing disease exploration across the research spectrum. Additionally, their work is international, which widely broadens their field of inquiry and the potential for groundbreaking discoveries because Broad Institute brings together a diverse group of individuals from across its partner institutions — undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, professional scientists, administrative professionals, and academic faculty. The culture and environment at the Broad is designed to encourage creativity and to engage all participants, regardless of role or seniority, in the mission of the Institute. Within this setting, researchers are empowered — both intellectually and technically — to confront even the most difficult biomedical challenges.

Thanks to you and everyone who participated in the contest, and purchases the calendar, we are able to contribute to Broad’s continuing pioneering research.

(Our terrific calendar is designed again this year by Brian Kristensen of Colorcodemedia.com.)

Posted in 2013 Calendar Contest, Fundraiser, Research | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Us In A Nutshell — Thanks, Chicago Tribune

Posted by Erich Trapp on October 11, 2012

Up Close and Personal — Melisa Kottmeier makes friends with Indy, one of two Great Pyrenees dogs owned by Luke Robinson, founder of the 2 Million Dogs organization, who spoke to dog owners at FYDO Land in Elgin about links between human and pet cancer. (photo by Darrell Goemaat)

The Chicago Tribune recently covered the story of 2 Million Dogs and did such a great job, we’d like to share it here in case you missed it.

“It’s [the article] not just about 2 Million Dogs.” says Executive Director Ginger Morgan, “It’s about how people live with cancer every day. By sharing this article you could be helping someone realize that they are not alone in their fight.”

The article was written by Amanda Marrazzo, Special to the Tribune. Photo credit is Darrell Goemaat, with the Chicago Tribune.

If you’d like to keep up with the work of 2 Million Dogs, you can set Google to do a Google Alert. How? Follow this link for simple directions.

Now, here’s the Chicago Tribune article …
October 10, 2012

When his beloved Great Pyrenees dog Malcolm died from bone cancer in 2004, Luke Robinson was sad and angry.

Adding to his loss: Nobody could tell him why.

“I didn’t even know dogs could get cancer,” Robinson said.

Beginning in 2008, Robinson and two of his other dogs, Murphy and Hudson, walked from his home in Texas to Boston to raise awareness about cancer in pets and links to human cancers as well. With stops and starts along the way, and Robinson and the dogs camping or staying with host families, the journey lasted more than two years.

“Somewhere on the cross-country walk I had this dream, this vision of taking the two dogs, walking 2,000 miles and making that into 2 million dogs,” he said.

And so his life’s mission was conceived. After the walk ended, the not-for-profit 2 Million Dogs was founded with the hope that eventually that number of canines and their owners will participate in walks to raise awareness and money to fund research to eradicate cancer from pets and people.

Humans share no direct genetic link with dogs, yet each dies from the same types of cancers in astronomical numbers, he said.

Sadly, Murphy was diagnosed with nasal cancer less than a month after arriving in Boston. He died a year and three days later.

Losing Murphy further strengthened his resolve.

“I think dogs are the canary in the coal mine,” he said. “I think that they hold the answer. They drink the same water we do, are exposed to the same air, environmental toxins. I can’t help to think since we don’t share a genetic link, there must be something in the environment.

“All the cancers we get, they are getting too,” he said. “And that is strange. … We share no evolutionary line with dogs. We don’t come from dogs and dogs don’t come from us.”

Robinson recently visited the Chicago area with Hudson and Indy, his newest “fuzzybutt,” on what he named the “Summer of Murphy Tour,” a cross-country journey in his van that he began in September.

He visited with local veterinary oncologists and met with dog lovers in Elgin and Schaumburg.

Robin Massey, owner of FYDO Land, dog day cares in Elgin and Huntley, said she was so moved by the mission at an event she attended last summer she became a co-chair of the local group.

“Unfortunately, being in the business I’m in, I have lost a lot of four-legged friends to cancer,” she said. “It’s not only about fighting cancer in canines, but about fighting cancer in everybody. It’s an all inclusive group.”

Since 2010, through events called Puppy-Up walks, 2 Million Dogs has raised $270,000, said Karyn Vasquez, a dog lover and member of the board of directors of the organization. About a third of the money goes to research, with the rest going toward education and awareness.

“For me, just letting people know that our companion animals really do get cancer is a huge step in the right direction,” said Vasquez, who lost her own dog, Chelios, to lymphoma on New Year’s Day 2010.

Last year the organization presented a $50,000 grant to Princeton University to fund the school’s study of canine mammary tumor development and progression.

“Mammary tumors are the most common tumors in intact female dogs,” she said. “In humans, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. Mammary tumors in dogs and breast cancer in women have many similarities, both in terms of risk factors and biology.”

Interest in the mission has grown.

In 2010 there were Puppy-Up walks in 12 cities across the United States. In 2011, there were walks in 27 cities, and this year there are about 32. So far, about 3,000 dogs and their owners have participated, said Ginger Morgan, executive director of 2 Million Dogs.

“We are still looking for many dogs and their owners to help us in our fight against cancer,” Morgan said, encouraging owners to bring their dogs to a Nov. 3 walk in West Dundee.

“When we hit 2 million dogs, we will still continue walking. We’ll walk until we find a cure, until we can find out what is causing cancer and how we can prevent it.”

Heather Neal, of Aurora, like Robinson, also believes that cancers, as well as other ailments, in both humans and canines are caused by the environment we live in, the food we eat, the water we drink and the air we breathe.

She owns Cadence, an 8-year-old standard poodle, who last year received treatment for osteosarcoma, a malignant bone cancer. After undergoing chemotherapy, the amputation of her right back leg, a switch to a raw food diet and a daily cocktail of herbal supplements, Cadence is doing much better and today is cancer-free.

“She is vibrant, full of life, energetic,” Neal said. “Being on three legs has not stopped her at all. She is like a tornado.”

Neal believes humans have a spiritual connection with their dogs, and that dogs are the key to unlocking the mysteries of cancer.

“They are more than just pets to us; they are a family member,” she said. “Let’s do what we can to cure (cancer). It will be good for dogs and human beings.”

Dr. Tiffany Leach, a veterinary oncologist who works at Specialty Vets in Buffalo Grove, said there are cancers that behave the same in humans and dogs, and there are also treatments that work on both human and dog cancers.

For example, sarcomas behave the same in children as they do in dogs, and there are medicines that can be used to treat both, Leach said.

“Vet oncology is so important to us because we can take a lot of the human cancers and get information to use for dog cancers,” she said.

As a resident at Purdue University she worked on a study of bladder cancer. It was found that the same treatments used for human bladder cancer were effective when used to treat bladder cancer in dogs.

It’s also been proved that pediatric osteosarcoma, or bone cancer, displays the same behaviors in children and dogs. And doctors are able to use the same treatments as veterinarians in treating it.

Leach also believes environmental factors play a role in canine and human cancers. But she also believes certain breeds tend to be prone to specific cancers. For example, she said, a Bernese mountain dog is prone to histiocytic sarcoma, an aggressive cancer that begins in the muscle tissue.

Leach herself knows firsthand the pain of dealing with cancer on more than one level. Her grandfather suffered with prostate cancer, which first led her to studying oncology along with veterinary medicine.

In 2005, she was diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma, or kidney cancer. Though she declined to go into detail about her health, she has gone through treatments and at least two surgeries, and simply said, “I’m handling it. I’m still able to go to work and lead a pretty normal life.”

Then there are her two beloved Irish wolfhounds, which each have dealt with their own cancers. Gideon, 6, had a soft-tissue sarcoma. The dog has had surgeries and radiation and is in remission. Jiggs, 9, was diagnosed with chondrosarcoma, a type of a bone cartilage tumor. Jiggs underwent surgery two months ago and seems to be in remission, she said.

All of these situations have confirmed that the profession she has chosen as her life’s work is exactly where she should be. She knows the struggles of cancer. She knows the heartache of a pet having a life-threatening disease. So when sitting with a pet owner and telling them their pet has cancer, she can honestly say she knows how they feel.

“You can at least genuinely say, ‘I’ve been through this and I understand,’ and you can really mean it on a level I couldn’t have had,” she said. “I’ve been lucky in that respect. I’m an undying optimist. I like to take the positive out of all of this.”

Robinson, meanwhile, is off to another city. His message is for all people, those with and without pets, and those who have or have not been affected by cancer.

“We are facing nature’s perfect enemy,” Robinson said. “No man, woman, child or companion animal is spared its killing field.”

A 2 Million Dog Puppy-Up will be held Nov. 3, at Randall Oaks Park, 1180 N. Randall Road, West Dundee. Registration is 10 a.m., opening ceremonies at 11:15 a.m., and a two-mile walk steps off at 11:30 a.m. Closing ceremonies will be at 12:30 p.m.

Preregistration by Nov. 1 is $20 per person (under the age of 14 is free). Day of walk registration is $25 per person. No limit on the number of dogs.

Dogs must be up to date on vaccinations and must not be on a retractable leash.

Posted in Events, Fundraiser, Puppy Up! Walks, Stories, Summer of Murphy Tour | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Summer of Murphy Tour in Little Rock Thursday

Posted by Erich Trapp on September 5, 2012

Murphy and Luke.

The Summer of Murphy Tour continues .. while the Nashville leg of the Tour was called because of bad weather, here’s another chance to be a part of The Summer of Murphy Tour.

From KARK 4 NEWS

Local dog lovers, in partnership with 2 Million Dogs, a national nonprofit organization working to support comparative oncology, are holding the event to do outreach and share life-saving information.

It’s part of 2 Million Dogs’ “Summer of Murphy” tour going on from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Little Rock Animal Village (4500 Kramer Street).

Just like people, companion animals develop cancer: brain, breast, bone and lung cancer; lymphoma and melanoma are all common in pets, who are exposed to the same environmental factors as humans. Veterinary oncologists believe there are between four and eight million new cases of cancer in companion animals every year. Most of those never receive adequate care or treatment and often go undiagnosed.
 
2 Million Dogs has built the largest pet and people cancer community in the world to advocate for comparative oncology, an emerging field of study that is broadening the understanding of the links between human and animal cancer.

“The field of comparative oncology is relatively new, however it has tremendous potential to give us key insights to what’s causing cancer across species,” said Ginger Morgan, executive director of 2 Million Dogs. “Comparative oncology is important and necessary if we want a world in which cancer is no longer one of the top killers of our children, our parents, and our pets.”

The Summer of Murphy Tour was inspired by the loss of one of the two companions who accompanied Luke Robinson on a cross-country walk to raise awareness of comparative oncology in 2008. Similarly, Robinson intends this tour to honor and celebrate the lives of other pets with cancer – those who have survived, those who are fighting, and those [who] have succumbed.

“Cancer touches everyone,” said Robinson. “Cancer is the world’s greatest scourge, the deadliest pandemic facing pets and people alike. We are here to celebrate and remember survivors as well as those we have lost, and share the spirit of Murphy and other dogs who do not give up or give in until the end.”

The Summer of Murphy tour, which started in August, visits 23 cities besides Little Rock, including: Nashville TN, Denison TX, Belton TX, San Antonio TX, Austin TX, Santa Fe NM, Albuquerque NM, Las Vegas NV for the First Annual Puppy Up Charity Golf Tournament, Denver CO, Garden City KS, Liberty MO, Chicago IL, Indianapolis IN, Cincinnati OH, Columbus OH, Fairborn OH, Pittsburgh PA, New Castle PA, Monessen PA, Clinton NJ, Jersey City NJ, New Milford CT, and Madison CT.

2 Million Dogs recently donated $50,000 for a comparative oncology study of mammary tumors at Princeton University in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania. The project treats shelter dogs with mammary tumors and then studies tissues to understand how breast cancer metastasizes in women.
 
2 Million Dogs, largest pet and people cancer community in the world, was established to support comparative oncology and educate the public about common links between cancer in humans and companion animals.

To learn more about the Summer of Murphy Tour, watch the trailer here.

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Congratulations and Thank You!

Posted by Erich Trapp on August 13, 2012

I can’t stop smiling!

2 Million Dogs is pleased to announce the winners of this year’s Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down calendar contest. They are:

Lily Lisle
Lily Humphrey
Villainous Vida von Wuffenhund Juno
Bailey Sandberg
Rio Monroe
Frasier Metcalf
Harley & Max Waterloo
Charlie Plank
Java Bell
Daisy Powell
Chase Weinand
Max Uphus
Tiny Turcan

We sincerely thank everyone who participated so generously and enthusiastically in this year’s contest, proceeds from which will be given to The Broad Institute. We will be announcing which Broad study the winners pick in a few days, so stay tuned.

Please remember, ALL the dogs (and the kitty) who were entered into the contest will appear in the Gallery. No one gets left behind.

And a very special thanks to the individuals who so kindly voted for the 14 dogs who had no votes.

We hope to have the calendars ready for sale by early October. They will be available through our store on our web site. I’ll post the link when they go on sale.

Thank you, everyone. Puppy Up!

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Duke Sanchez

Posted by Erich Trapp on August 9, 2012

Sometimes people only hear about our calendar contest at the last minute, when it’s much too late to enter. So is the case with this beautiful boy. I got Technical Sergeant Claudia Sanchez’s entry just as the last votes were being counted, and my heart sank because he missed the contest. But you must meet Duke and read a bit of his story. Remember him … I hope he will be our first entry next year.

Duke Sanchez

 

(by Claudia Sanchez, TSgt, USAF) Duke was a rescue that our family adopted after he followed us home one day after a jog. He fit right in with our other dogs and became my running partner. We got him sept 2011 and he was diagnosed with bone cancer November 2011 and laid to rest Jan 2012. In that short time he became not only my running partner but also my motivator. He kept me running and rehabilitated me after I became bedridden for a month. He gave me his everything and asked for nothing. My heart still hurts and I’ll always miss him.

There is nothing I wouldn’t give for one more run with him.

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