2 Million Dogs – The Blog

Cancer. Touches. Everyone.

Posts Tagged ‘current research in canine cancers’

Breast Cancer And Dogs: The Next ‘Canaries In The Coal Mine’?

Posted by Erich Trapp on October 12, 2013

By Lynne Peeples, Huffington Post

(Thanks to Lynne Peeples and the Huffington Post for this article.)

When his beloved Great Pyrenees Malcolm died of bone cancer at age 6, Luke Robinson resolved to learn why.

“I didn’t even know dogs could get cancer,” he said.

The nagging mystery would send Robinson walking over 2,000 miles from Austin, Texas, to Boston with his other two dogs to raise awareness for canine cancer. It would also inspire his launch of an organization devoted to finding an answer — through the discovery of links between dog and human tumors.

“Breast cancer was the first cancer we funded,” said Robinson, co-founder of the nonprofit 2 Million Dogs . “Under a microscope, a mammary tumor from a dog and from a person look the same.”

As the prolific pink ribbons seek to remind us this month, breast cancer’s grip remains strong and its reach ever-expanding. One in eight women in the U.S. will now face the diagnosis — a rise of 40 percent in just one generation.

Perhaps less well-known, however, is that most breast cancers are not hereditary and that cancer is the leading disease-related killer of dogs, with mammary tumors the most common type afflicting females. (Early spaying significantly reduces the risk of such tumors.) These facts, combined with mounting evidence of harm posed by certain chemicals used on carpets, couches, food bowls, squeaky toys and manicured lawns enjoyed by people and pets — has led some experts and advocates to recommend a shift in breast cancer research and funding.

Only about 10 percent of breast cancer research dollars are devoted to its environmental causes, according to a federal interagency report published in February.

Luke Robinson and his two dogs, Murphy and Hudson, peer from a tent during his canine cancer awareness walk from Austin, Tex. to Boston in 2008. (Marei Burnfield)

Luke Robinson and his two dogs, Murphy and Hudson, peer from a tent during his canine cancer awareness walk from Austin, Tex. to Boston in 2008. (Marei Burnfield)

“Dogs drink our same water, they are exposed to the same toxins,” Robinson said. “The logical assumption is that indeed there is an environmental basis for these cancers. But a lot of research and funding comes from pharmaceutical companies. And there’s no money in cause and prevention.”

Overall, growing interest in canine cancer has led to new comparative oncology research at the University of Pennsylvania and Princeton University, with financial help from 2 Million Dogs. Investigators are treating shelter dogs that have developed mammary cancer, while gleaning information about the progression of the disease. The researchers hope to identify treatments that will benefit both dogs and humans.

Penn veterinarians previously studied dogs involved in September 11 search and rescue missions thought to be exposed to chemicals in the rubble. They found no elevated rates of major health problems in the decade after the attack.

To read the entire article by Huffington Post, please follow this link.

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More Ways to Help

Posted by Erich Trapp on July 23, 2013

broad boxerOur “Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down” 2014 calendar is in full swing, so stop by and vote for your favorite canine cancer heroes. Your voting dollars will go to The Broad Institute again this year, and we want to raise as much as we can to further their work. Their research is international and encompasses canine cancer exploration at the DNA level. Last year the calendar contest winners chose to fund Broad’s Canine Osteosarcoma study. This year’s winners will have the same opportunity to choose which study to support.

And the work Broad does is translational*, which means it helps in human cancer research as well.

Some Background — Since the Human Genome Mapping Project began, $3 billion has been spent over 15 years to generate a reliable sequence of the human genome. Sequence of the canine genome was generated in 2004, taking only about a year to finish and costing about $50 million. (Source.)

Throughout this period of intense research, an important fact has emerged. People and dogs are extraordinarily similar in a genetic sense. But while it takes thousands of human patients with cancer to identify risk factors, it only takes maybe 100 canine patients to identify these factors in dogs. This is because their genetic makeup is not as ‘noisy’ as that of humans. As such, researchers can look at the genetics of cancer in dogs to accelerate discoveries that will benefit both dogs and people.

As you probably already know, the statistics on cancer in dogs are alarming, and in fact, the current rate of cancer is higher in dogs than it is in humans.

But did you know that dogs are:

  • Twice as likely to develop leukemia than humans.
  • Four times more likely to suffer from breast cancer.
  • Eight times more likely to develop bone cancer.
  • An incredible thirty-five times more at risk for developing skin cancer. (Source.)

So, besides voting in the calendar contest to support the work of Broad, how can you help further the research they’re doing the rest of the year?

Broad needs DNA samples from purebred dogs who have been diagnosed with the cancers Broad is studying, as well as from older, healthy dogs (ages 8+ years) from the same breeds. Currently those cancers are: Hemangiosarcoma, Osteosarcoma (bone cancer), Lymphoma, Mast Cell Tumors, Mammary Tumors, Melanoma (skin cancer), and Glioma (tumors that start in the brain or spine).

Why are DNA samples important? At its deepest root, cancer is caused by damage to the DNA. DNA is found in every cell and is responsible for directing cells in normal behavior patterns. Under normal circumstances, the body is able to repair DNA damage, but when that damage isn’t repaired, the cells begin to behave abnormally, beginning the out-of-control growth that leads to cancer formation. (Source.)

Why purebred dogs? In developing breeds, certain physical features (size, shape, coat, color) and behaviors were selected by breeders. This genetic diversity makes purebreds dogs ideal for genetic research. Using samples from only purebred dogs ensures the fastest progress for all dogs.

If your purebred dog has had cancer or is an older, healthy dogs (age 8+) please visit www.broadinstitute.org/dogsamples where you’ll find information to guide you on working with your vet to collect and ship blood samples to use in their studies.

To learn more about the breeds they study and the work your votes will be funding, please follow this link: www.broadinstitute.org/dogresearch.

Broad Institute on blackBroad’s Ethical Statement: The Broad Institute’s Canine Disease Mapping group performs disease research under a conservative ethical model that no harm should come to the dogs. Dogs enrolled in their studies are pet dogs, participating after owner consent, only in ways that do not harm them. They DO NOT induce cancer in dogs, nor do they ever keep any animals in the laboratory.

Thank you for supporting the efforts of 2 Million Dogs and The Broad Institute through your participation in the 2014 “Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down” calendar. Don’t forget to cast your votes for your favorite dogs before voting ends at midnight, EDT, August 8th.

*Translational research is research in the laboratory with an eye toward learning things that could be brought back to patients (both animal and human) in the clinical setting.

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Reggie Duman and His Tumexal Treatment

Posted by Erich Trapp on June 30, 2013

Beth Duman recently sent us this story about her Belgian Tervuren and an alternative treatment he is receiving for his osteosarcoma. It’s called Tumexal.

Disclaimer: Please remember, we post this and information like this to inform our readers of potential new/different/alternative treatments for their beloved companions. 2 Million Dogs does not endorse any particular treatment, protocol, therapy, veterinarian, and/or drug. It is up to each individual to do his or her own research and then act accordingly on the information they are able to gather. But we wanted to share with you the success Beth is having with this particular treatment for this particular dog and his disease. Here is what she shared with us.

Beautiful Reggie.

Beautiful Reggie.

This beautiful boy, Reggie, is a nine-year-old gorgeous Belgian Tervuren. About four months ago, he started gimping on his left front foot. We have some very good vets on our community so I visited three of them a number of times. Two of the vets are skilled in alternative medicine so Reggie received chiropractic treatments, electro-chiropractic treatments, Chinese herbs, acupuncture, pain  and anti-inflammatory medications. I also worked with a wonderful Tellington Touch practitioner and message therapist.

Reggie continued to get worse until he was in pain that was causing him to occasionally scream and making it hard for him to sleep without constantly readjusting himself because of his discomfort. We increased his pain meds. He was only going outside to relieve himself and could no longer use the doorway that involved walking down two steps to get outside.

Finally after months of his physical and mental deterioration, one of the chiropractor vets was able to feel a tumor under his left scapula. The vet was not certain that the tumor was operable  so I immediately made an appointment with the vet who was the most skilled surgeon. She did a number of X-rays and attempted to aspirate the tumor. The X-rays showed a mass 77 mm in size in an area that was not easily accessed. She had the long hard conversation with me about  possible options for Reggie. If she were to amputate his leg, she would also need to remove the shoulder. Amputation would serve to lesson his pain but, no doubt, the cancer would have already metastasized to his lungs. Chemotherapy  might add a couple months to his life, as might radiation. I asked her what she would do if he were her dog with a similar prognosis. She said pain management would be her choice. I agreed.

When I got home, I looked up a cancer researcher’s contact information. I had stumbled on Dr. Nice’s web site some months before – when my dogs were all healthy. He had sent me a Power Point presentation about his cancer intervention protocol. I immediately called Dr. Nice and arranged to have treatment sent for Reggie.

For the last month, Reggie has been taking three specially prepared capsules along with a couple of milliliters of a liquid to help him absorb the capsules. Twice a day, I rub in a cream version of the treatment on his shaved chest at the tumor site.

One month later, Reggie’s tumor has shrunk to 50 mm. He is off all pain medications and is happy and active. He has a slight limp but easily walks and trots. He’s now soliciting play from our other dogs and back to being my active friendly buddy.

He will be following Dr. Nice’s protocol for two more months. I have been in contact with Dr. Nice about Reggie’s progress and has shared that other dogs are seeing similar results. The treatment is called Tumexal. Dr. Nice’s web site is www.CanineCare.us.

I hope this information will be beneficial to others who are dealing with choosing treatment  options for their dogs. It has certainly been a blessing to us and Reggie.

 

Beth Duman, VSPDT, CPDT-KA

Beth Duman is a biologist and positive dog trainer in Michigan. Her highly rated training book, The Evolution of Charlie Darwin: Partner With Your Dog Using Positive Training, can be purchased at Amazon.com.

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Pssssssttt … Hey you. Yeah – you! Come over here.

Posted by Erich Trapp on June 27, 2013

Princess Daisy telling Bob a secret.

Princess Daisy telling Bob a secret. (Photo by Bev Hollis.)

There’s this calendar contest going on and I have the inside scoop … OK. OK. Yeah – I get it. Dog. Scoop. Real funny. Pay attention.

Anyway, I have the inside scoop.

Can you please stop giggling and let me tell you something? Take a breath and chill.

OK. You alright now?

Finally.

Look, there’s this terrific calendar contest going on. It’s called Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down and it’s going to have all sorts of photos and stories of very brave dogs with cancer in it, and lots of other neat stuff.  I know all about it because my friend Princess Daisy was on the very first cover. Yes, The Princess Daisy. The One and Only. That’s her in the photo, before she went to the Rainbow Bridge. She’s gossiping with her friend Bob.

So, I know Princess Daisy and she knows all about 2 Million Dogs and where they sent their calendar proceeds last year – the money they made when people like you sent them their photos and stories and votes. The Princess has a very high security clearance here at The Rainbow Bridge, and she told me that she got to read the very letter from The Broad Institute about how they’re using the funds from last year’s calendar contest to study osteosarcoma in several breeds: Leonbergers and Goldens and Great Danes and Great Pyrenees. The very funds people donated to study genes and dogs and cancer. This is very important research that Broad is doing, and they collaborate with other scientists and research organizations from all over the world. So this is a big deal. A really big deal. And all the people who participated in the contest last year had a hand in helping make this research possible by taking part in the calendar contest.

No kidding.

But what I really need to tell you is that time is running out to enter. You have to send your photos and stories to Erich (erich@2milliondogs.org) right away. And then, when voting starts, you have to get all your friends and co-workers and aunts and uncles and cousins and brothers and sister and even total strangers to vote, because the money you and your friends donate will go to research to help dogs, and even people. Yes, people. Dogs and people get the same kinds of cancers. Haven’t you been paying any attention?

The important thing to know is that each year the calendar contest supports research that help dogs and people. But you can’t help if you don’t enter and you don’t vote.

So? What are you waiting for?

Follow this link to find out about the calendar contest and how to enter.

Then send a photo and story of your dog who has or has had cancer to Erich at erich@2milliondogs.org. He’s pretty cool and he’ll write you back when he gets your stuff.

Oh, and Princess Daisy said I’d better include her cover photo from the very first Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down calendar from 2009. Princess Daisy_2009-calendarHonestly, I think she’s sticking her tongue out at cancer.

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Auburn University in Alabama Testing Bone Cancer Treatment for Dogs

Posted by Erich Trapp on May 13, 2013

Many of the dogs we have met through the 2 Million Dogs Foundation, and earlier with 2 Dog 2000 Miles, have suffered from bone cancer (osteosarcoma). This article, by Evan Belanger, details how Auburn University is testing a new treatment for osteosarcoma. You can find the complete article here as well.

Auburn testing bone-cancer treatment for dogs that could increase survivability and translate to human treatments

 

Pictured is Lily Johnson. “Most dogs suffering from bone cancer must have the impacted leg amputated. In more than 90 percent of cases, the cancer cells migrate to the lungs, creating demand for new treatments.”

Pictured is Lily Johnson.
“Most dogs suffering from bone cancer must have the impacted leg amputated. In more than 90 percent of cases, the cancer cells migrate to the lungs, creating demand for new treatments.”

By Evan Belanger

AUBURN, Alabama — Auburn University is testing a new treatment for bone cancer in dogs that a university veterinarian says could one day be broadened to treat human cancers.

The American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation has awarded Bruce Smith, director of the Auburn University Research Initiative in Cancer, a two-year grant totaling $118,848 to test the new therapy.

The treatment consists of a virus normally used as a hepatitis vaccine in dogs that has been modified to only make copies of itself when inside cancer cells.

It ruptures the cancer cells, killing them and releasing thousands of copies to attack other cancer cells.

“By using this approach, we turn the cancer cell into a factory that produces more virus,” Smith said. “You could say that we help the cancer cell become an agent of its own death.”

The immediate goal of the study is to prove the efficacy of the new treatment for bone cancer, but Smith said the long-term goal is to create a single treatment that can treat multiple types of cancer in dogs.

The lessons learned could also be used to create new treatments for human cancer and could lead to human trials in partnership with a medical college, he said.

“Ultimately, we want that to be a clinical treatment in dogs,” Smith said. “But it’s also something that’s going to tell us something about how to use this approach in people, so we’re very big on this idea of one medicine.”

Bone cancer in dogs, which accounts for about 5 percent of tumors in dogs, has a very poor survival rate.

In most cases, the dog’s leg is amputated to make the dog more comfortable and remove the tumor, but the cancer cells migrate to the lungs more than 90 percent of the time.

In those cases, dogs that receive chemotherapy typically only live nine to 12 months post diagnosis, creating demand for more effective treatments.

“This therapy attacks those metastases and will hopefully eliminate them or make them more sensitive to chemotherapy,” Smith said.

The study will involve 20 dogs over two years. All dogs must be referred by a veterinarian and must have all four legs intact so researchers can collect live cancer cells from the tumor.

The grant will cover the cost of the viral treatment, but owners must pay for the cost of amputation and chemotherapy, treatments with which the viral injection is intended to work in conjunction.

The Auburn University Research Initiative in Cancer was founded in 2012 to accelerate the translation of cancer innovation from the laboratory to the clinic.

AURIC follows a “one-medicine” concept that views human and animal health as a single field where discoveries in one species advances health in both species.

“Dogs are actually very similar physiologically to people, and a lot of the cancers they get have the same gene mutations,” Smith said.

“Tumors like breast cancer is very, very similar between dogs and humans. Dogs get skin cancer, dogs get blood cancers that are similar to human cancers, dogs get brain cancers that similar to human cancers … so what we learn in dogs is very applicable to humans.”

 

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What? Say it isn’t so!

Posted by Erich Trapp on July 31, 2012

What??? Some dogs have NO VOTES? That can’t be right. Are you trying to break my heart??

We have a terrific line-up of beautiful dogs this year, but I noticed there are at least 50 dogs who haven’t been voted for even once. Really? That can’t be right.

So I’m thinking, maybe everyone doesn’t have the right link for voting? So I’m posting it again. You only have until August the 8th at midnight EDT to rally the troops and get friends and family (and you) to vote for your pupper(s). If you have any questions about voting, please email me at erich@2milliondogs.org.

OK, here’s the link to the Fundraiser Directory.  You can keep track of the voting tallies there.

And here’s a fun little video about voting you can send to friends and family: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpFmhezokO0

Remember, votes are only $1.00 (starting at $5.00 and > in dollar increments thereafter). Your votes not only go towards your favorite pup but the money we raise will help fund one of three studies with The Broad Institute. Why is this important? Because, among other things, they are studying the genomics of some major canine cancers: lymphoma, mast cell tumors, and osteosarcoma. In so many of the stories this year, these were three of the predominant cancers. Your voting dollars can contribute to helping find the causes of canine cancer.

The 13 dogs with the most votes not only win a month on the calendar (or the cover), but their people decide which of the three studies above 2 Million Dogs will help fund. You can’t get more direct involvement than that unless you’re the one holding the test tube!! Yes, your votes matter. Not only to these dogs, but to so many other pups stricken with cancer.

2 Million Dogs knows there are many organizations to which you can send your money. We appreciate your involvement with us. And there are many organizations looking to find cures, and that’s admirable too. But why not look at the causes of cancer, so fewer dogs have to suffer to begin with? Help us get to the heart of the matter.

Cancer. Touches. Everyone.

Help us fund the research that has the potential to find a way to stop it before it starts.

Thank you.

In case you’re in the mood for it, here’s a bit of geek for you:

Genetics scrutinizes the functioning and composition of the single gene whereas genomics addresses all genes and their inter relationships in order to identify their combined influence on the growth and development of the organism.

What’s the difference between genetics and genomics?

Genetics is the study of single genes and their effects. For example, Huntington’s or Tay-Sachs disease would be considered “genetics” because a single gene causes these diseases, despite environmental interactions.

Genomics is the study of all your genes including interactions of those genes with each other and with your environment. For example, heart disease, asthma, diabetes, and cancer would all be considered “genomics” because they are caused by genetic and environmental factors.

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The Texas Veterinary Cancer Registry

Posted by Erich Trapp on May 26, 2012

The Texas Veterinary Cancer Registry (TVCR) is a Texas-based animal care database formed to identify and register pets with cancer in order to facilitate and promote their medical treatment that lead to cures for cancer in pets and people.

As a joint effort of the CARE Foundation, Baylor University Medical Center (BUMC) at Dallas and the Texas Veterinary Oncology Group, The Texas Veterinary Cancer Registry will advance medical breakthroughs in both animal and human care, helping to ensure that new treatments are available for cancer in humans become available to animals in an efficient and timely manner.

The TVCR will advance veterinary cancer research by gathering information from pet owners whose pets have been diagnosed with a naturally-occurring cancer. Subsequent enrollment in clinical trials of new drugs and devices to improve the animal’s healthcare may be possible.

Their Mission

The Texas Veterinary Cancer Registry aims to advance veterinary cancer research and to create connections between researchers, veterinarians and owners of pets with naturally-occurring disease that could provide the critical data to someday help eliminate cancer as we know it. 

Click here to find out how the registry works and how you can register your dog or cat.

About Pet Cancer

Cancer is a group of diseases in which abnormal cells grow without control, they invade surrounding tissues and ultimately spread to organs throughout the body. There are more than a hundred specific cancer types, each showing unique behaviors and requiring tumor specific treatment strategies. In a normal body, new cells (which form the structures of the body and control its functions) are constantly being made to replace old or damaged cells. This process is very well regulated with a delicate balance existing between cell multiplication and cell death to maintain the right number of cells. When this process goes wrong and the body begins to produce more cells than it needs and/or cells don’t die when they should, the extra cells may undergo genetic changes and can then form a mass called a tumor.

The article is extensive and covers: Canine Tumors, Insulinomas, Chondrosarcoma of the bone in dogs, Hemangioma and Hemangiosarcoma in dogs, Canine Lymphosarcoma (LSA), Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Mast Cell Tumors, Basal Cell Carcinomas, Lymphoma, Osteosarcoma, and Melanoma. To read the full article, please click here.

To contact TCVR, please follow this link.

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“Man’s best friend may conquer man’s most feared illnesses, say Texas A&M veterinarians”

Posted by Erich Trapp on May 10, 2012

Texas A&M veterinary professor Heather Wilson-Robles with some of her canine patients.

This article is from EarthSky.

“COLLEGE STATION, May 9, 2012 – It could be that man’s best friend might one day be man’s best healer.”

“Dogs are among the best animals when it comes to providing models for better medical treatments in humans, and with more than 77 million dogs in the United States alone, it’s another way the human-animal bond has become closer than anyone had ever dreamed. Researchers at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences are looking into ways how dogs – and several other animal types – can provide a variety of medical benefits to people, ranging from bone cancer studies to spinal cord injuries and others.”

“Dogs can be ideal models to study,” says Theresa Fossum, director of the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies.

“This is especially true when it comes to certain types of cancer. Cancers in dogs, such as bone cancer, lymphoma and many other types of tumors, are almost identical to those same kinds found in humans and they tend to develop faster and run their course quicker, so it’s an ideal way to see if a certain therapy will work. Dogs also tend to be better predictors of how new cancer drugs and medical devices can work. By studying cancer treatments in dogs, we can come up with better and more improved ways to treat cancer in humans and animals.”


” Bone cancer in dogs, Fossum explains, is almost identical to human bone cancer. To get a big picture of just how the disease forms and progresses in dogs, Fossum has helped to create the Texas Veterinary Cancer Registry, a database of treatment information. ”

For the full article, and to find out more about the Texas Veterinary Cancer Registry, please follow this link.

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Savage Mountain

Posted by Erich Trapp on January 11, 2012

Luke Robinson and Ginger Morgan present a check to Princeton University for the The Canine Mammary Tumor Program.

by Luke Robinson

[Wednesday, January 11, 2012]  Six years ago to this day, I lost my boy Malcolm to metastatic cancer and on this anniversary, it is with tremendous honor I announce the funding of The 2 Million Dogs Foundation‘s first research initiative: A breast cancer study benefiting both humans and canines.

The 2 Million Dogs Foundation presented a check for $50,000 to Princeton University today to help fund the school’s Molecular Study of Canine Mammary Tumor Development and Progression: From Genome To Clinical Outcome.

Mammary tumors are the most common tumors in intact female dogs, and in humans, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women – approximately one in eight women develop breast cancer during their lifetime. Mammary tumors in dogs and breast cancer in women have many similarities, both in terms of risk factors and biology.

The 2 Million Dogs Foundation chose this study for the following reasons:

First and foremost, it’s translational in that people stand to significantly benefit as well as our canine companions.

Second, it’s collaborative. The Canine Mammary Tumor Program  began at The University of Pennsylvania with Dr. Karin Sorenmo whom we met while walking through Philadelphia. Collaboration, we feel, is key if we plan to make significant strides in cancer research.

Third, the tissue samples were collected from shelter dogs diagnosed with breast cancer, and they were all treated, at no expense, by UPenn as part of their program.

And finally, we feel that the approach of this study is novel, not incremental, and could potentially yield critical insights into metastatic breast cancer.

While we have donated $50,000, 2 Million Dogs has pledged to raise an additional $30,000 this year to study more tissue samples.   Click here to help us raise the additional funds needed or contact ginger@2milliondogs.org for other ways you can help.

I owe a tremendous debt of gratitude to the many, many people who made this day possible. My family back in Texas, our supporters, fans, and friends, both new and old, the hundreds of strangers that helped Hudson, Murphy and me get from Austin to Boston safely, the folks at 2 Million Dogs, and to Ginger Morgan, the Executive Director, who has believed in my vision since the day we walked through Memphis.

And finally, to those who had the courage to always believe. God bless you.  Keep the faith and puppy up!

Postcript

I remember standing atop Savage Mountain, the highest peak on the Rails-Trails from Pittsburgh to DC in August of 2009.  It was a glorious afternoon – a crystalline sky colored in an indescribable blue like the Frio River that cuts through the Texas hill country.  I wrote a poem about Malcolm entitled “Savage Heart” and I thought it incredibly ironic that this mountain was our highest hurdle.

As I sat perched upon a rock, reflecting on our journey, I could see for hundreds of miles.

(Reprinted from http://2dogs2000miles.blogspot.com/2012/01/savage-mountain.html)

To view the video presentation, please click here.

To view the WZBN TV coverage from Princeton, please click here.

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Down to the Wire!

Posted by Erich Trapp on October 1, 2011

Here's Pete, our 2011 calendar winner!

Lucie, our cover girl from 2010.

Princess Daisy, our first cover girl, from 2009.

 

Don’t miss all the fun and excitement as we close in on the final two hours of the 4th Annual “Cancer Can’t Keep a Good Dog Down” 2012 calendar contest. Click on the link and scroll down to read all the stories, see the beautiful faces, and vote for your favorite pups! They all deserve votes, and we still have a few who have none.

So stop by, enjoy the stories and photos, and support 2 Million Dogs by voting for your favorites. Contest ends tonight at midnight central time.

Thanks to everyone who has made this another exciting calendar contest!

Puppy Up!

 

 

 

2 Million Dogs is a 501 C (3) organization. We rely on the generosity of individuals and corporations to help us in our mission to eradicate cancer through education, awareness, and investing in comparative oncology studies.

 

 

 

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