2 Million Dogs – The Blog

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Purdue Vaccination Studies and Auto-antibodies

Posted by Erich Trapp on April 26, 2011

There’s an interesting article written by Catherine O’Driscoll and published on-line by Dogs Naturally Magazine about a study done at Purdue University School of Veterinary Medicine to determine if vaccines can cause changes in the immune system of dogs that might lead to life-threatening immune-mediated diseases.

The article is quite extensive and goes on to discuss a wide range of vaccine-induced diseases, including some cancers. There is also a helpful source of references at the end.

In summary:

Not only are annual boosters unnecessary, but they subject the pet to potential risks such as allergic reactions and immune-mediated haemolytic anaemia.

In plain language, veterinary schools in America, plus the American Veterinary Medical Association, have looked at studies to show how long vaccines last and they have concluded and announced that annual vaccination is unnecessary.

Further, they have acknowledged that vaccines are not without harm.

Please check out the complete article here.

Please note: Articles of a medical nature are posted here merely for your consideration. We know that as responsible pet owners you will do your own research. We post these studies, opinions, and articles to encourage further discussion and research, and welcome your thoughtful remarks.

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6 Responses to “Purdue Vaccination Studies and Auto-antibodies”

  1. Kim said

    You know, I don’t even need to read all of the research to know the truth of the answers. I thank you for bringing this to the attention of so many. Animals, like humans, are suffering from a medical industry that seems almost driven to over medicate or inoculate; not with the well being of the creature in mind, but the fattening of someone’s pocketbook. It is interesting that people are just now waking up, when to me, the answers have been clear all along. It is easy for an expert to prey on the everyday “Joe” when we are programed to believe anything we are told by someone in a position of power or knowledge.

  2. Gus Morgan said

    Here are the links to the summary and full report:
    http://replay.web.archive.org/20061130200545/http://www.vet.purdue.edu/epi/great_dane_vaccinosis_fullreport_jan04.pdf
    http://replay.web.archive.org/20080720033607/http://www.vet.purdue.edu/epi/great_dane_vaccinosis_summary_GDHF.pdf

    I contacted Dr. Glickman by email who confirms these are links to the final report to the Hayward Foundation; I am awaiting his reply regarding the contradiction between Ms. O’Driscoll’s conclusions and the conclusion of the study:

    “….Conclusions
    As in two previous studies we conducted, we confirmed that vaccinated dogs when compared with non-vaccinated dogs have a higher concentration of antibodies in their serum directed against bovine proteins such as thyroglobulin and fibronectin. These antibodies are probably produced in response to contaminants from fetal calf serum commonly used to make canine vaccines. These anti-bovine antibodies probably then cross-react with a dog’s own thyroglobulin and fibronectin, resulting in detectable concentrations of autoantibodies in their serum. It would be difficult to design a study in pet dogs to prove this process of cross-reaction between bovine and canine proteins actually causes clinical signs of autoimmune disease in vaccinated dogs. There were too many differences between the vaccinated and unvaccinated Great Danes in the present study to further explore the clinical consequences of vaccine-related auto-antibodies produced against fibronectin or thyroglobulin.

    The best way to determine if repeated vaccination of Great Danes causes autoimmune disease would be to prospectively follow a large number of regularly vaccinated and non- vaccinated dogs from birth, performing annual physical examinations and blood tests for autoimmunity. In our experience however, it is unlikely owners of unvaccinated Great Danes would actively participate in such a study. Therefore, the long-term potential adverse consequence of repeated vaccination is likely to remain unknown. Until further studies are done, we recommend that all Great Danes continue to be vaccinated using core vaccines as per guidelines published by the American Animal Hospital Association. You should discuss these guidelines with your veterinarian and work together to determine how they can be individualized to fit your dog’s life style…”

  3. Gus Morgan said

    I am not advocating for or against vaccinating pets, however I caution people against making decisions based on an interpretation of a study. I checked out Catherine O’Driscoll’s sources, and in fact, the first two sources are not reliable: the first is a link to a breeder’s website which did not re-publish the study accurately; the breeder’s website is interspersed with the author’s opinion and interpretations of the study. The second link does not work.

    I think it is irresponsible of Ms. O’Driscoll to base her article on such sources. At the very least, I would expect the author to contact the university for permission to reprint or link to the study.

    Here are two links that contain the actual full report and summary:
    http://replay.web.archive.org/20061130200545/http://www.vet.purdue.edu/epi/great_dane_vaccinosis_fullreport_jan04.pdf
    http://replay.web.archive.org/20080720033607/http://www.vet.purdue.edu/epi/great_dane_vaccinosis_summary_GDHF.pdf

    “….Conclusions
    As in two previous studies we conducted, we confirmed that vaccinated dogs when compared with non-vaccinated dogs have a higher concentration of antibodies in their serum directed against bovine proteins such as thyroglobulin and fibronectin. These antibodies are probably produced in response to contaminants from fetal calf serum commonly used to make canine vaccines. These anti-bovine antibodies probably then cross-react with a dog’s own thyroglobulin and fibronectin, resulting in detectable concentrations of autoantibodies in their serum. It would be difficult to design a study in pet dogs to prove this process of cross-reaction between bovine and canine proteins actually causes clinical signs of autoimmune disease in vaccinated dogs. There were too many differences between the vaccinated and unvaccinated Great Danes in the present study to further explore the clinical consequences of vaccine-related auto-antibodies produced against fibronectin or thyroglobulin.

    The best way to determine if repeated vaccination of Great Danes causes autoimmune disease would be to prospectively follow a large number of regularly vaccinated and non- vaccinated dogs from birth, performing annual physical examinations and blood tests for autoimmunity. In our experience however, it is unlikely owners of unvaccinated Great Danes would actively participate in such a study. Therefore, the long-term potential adverse consequence of repeated vaccination is likely to remain unknown. Until further studies are done, we recommend that all Great Danes continue to be vaccinated using core vaccines as per guidelines published by the American Animal Hospital Association. You should discuss these guidelines with your veterinarian and work together to determine how they can be individualized to fit your dog’s life style…”

    As the owner of a senior dog with hypothyroidism, I would have been grateful for definitive proof I can bring my vet against vaccinating him further. As it is, I have refused yearly vaccines and only vaccinated my pets for rabies as required by law.

    I believe that “when we know better, we do better” and I am grateful for the knowledge I have gained since researching these issues so please do not get upset with my post. It was intended to educate and inform, not inflame.

  4. Gus Morgan said

    UNSUBSCRIBE

    • Stan Delventhal said

      My dog just died from AIHA after having had two very severe reactions to the Lepto vaccine three and four years ago. I do think that there is just concern for this theory on vaccines. I will tell everyone of my concerns so in the future people will ask more about what their pets are being given. I’m extremely angry that I was not educated on these issues before I had my dog vaccinated.

  5. ladyatheist said

    O’Driscoll’s article cites non-existent studies by Purdue. I don’t trust her

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